“Love in the Twenty-First” by Ayesha F. Hamid

If someone isn’t rich, find someone with funds,
silver, diamonds, gold, enough to see you through.
If he’s not cold enough, with no head to fend
off the brutality of life, then find a man
who feels less, one not cornered by compunction,
who does what he must, giving out pink slips
left and right. When she’s not young enough,
cut your ties, give a divorce, leave your
first wife. Not thin enough, find someone
smaller, someone who helps you fit in
for love’s never set in stone, so go
through as many as you need till you find the one.
Till you find true love in the twenty-first.

A Book Review of “I Am Terezin” by Ayesha F. Hamid

Immutable rules govern our world such as the law that no matter the time or space in which it occurs, evil committed by humans against other human beings leaves its mark, and that regardless of the amount of time it takes, the truth will always surface. These ideas, as well as others, are explored in depth in Richard D. Bank’s I Am Terezin.

With meticulous historical research and great care, Bank has painted a vivid picture of the people and personalities associated with the events that took place at Theresienstadt during the Nazi Holocaust. I Am Terezin is a revolutionary memoir – unlike others, it is written from the point of view, not of a person but, of a physical entity, the camp itself – an omniscient narrator. The voice of the camp comes alive to relay the ominous reality of itself, and it tells the reader what Theresienstadt really was, a concentration camp and not the paradise ghetto for elderly Jews the Nazis claimed it was.

The changing tone and perspective of the omniscient voice is compelling. The voice of the camp takes on many roles – a caretaker in one moment, a silent observer in another. It can be argued that the voice of the camp is none other than that of a lamenting God, unable to intercede in the world of human atrocities and forced to watch insidious actions play out. No matter the tone or perspective, the abuse, injustice, and crime which occurred at Theresienstadt is resurrected for the reader, and the reader comes to learn intimately about the lives of innocents who were forced to be bound within the walls of Terezin. Each word and sentence of I Am Terezin is written with great care, paying homage to the many who lost their lives at Theresienstadt. In taking part in the arduous undertaking of researching and telling the story of those at Terezin, Bank has completed the ultimate labor of love in tribute to his grandparents, Ludwig and Sophie Frank, who were imprisoned at but subsequently survived Theresienstadt.

Bank is masterful in his knowledge of the history of Theresienstadt, and I Am Terezin is a must read for scholars of the Holocaust, as well as those interested in bettering the human condition. Reading this book will help the vigilant to reaffirm the oath of never again. Never again should sadism be allowed to hide behind laws and systems meant to dehumanize. Never again should humanity allow the atrocities of genocide to occur. Never again should any people be persecuted for the faith they follow or for the way in which they worship the Divine.

I Am Terezin is published by Auctus Publishers (www.auctuspublishers.com) and available at Amazon and Barnes and Nobles.

“Escape on Saturdays” by Ayesha F. Hamid

Saturday’s ritual is discourse at diners,
when we talk while walking
to our regular hangout, The Green Kitchen.

As we wipe our feet on the mat on the floor,
we exit a pressure cooker, of sorts,
as worries are left at the door.

The mornings here mean so much more
than French Toast, eggs, home fries.

Forgetting brimming calendars,
we find a space of solace
where it’s just you and me,
fresh silverware, an easy cup of coffee.

Now protected within parameters
of peace, the havoc halts.

Relaxed, we breathe, and talk, and laugh.

“Succession” by Ayesha F. Hamid

Look at night skies ascend
as the day comes too quickly to an end.

Young stars start to cross,
covering the field of narrowing night sky,
constellations congealing, shining yet pale,
as sleep takes the world away.

The earth quietly moves changing space,
never returning to that exact place
before the world wakes.

With succession like cyclones, the new day
will overwhelm the body, the heart, the brain,
taking away whatever life is left.

But hold the memory of the morning always
and don’t forget to feel it all:

the air against your face, the softness of the sun
at break of day, its rays translucent,
never harsh, never blaring, never burning,
life’s breath moving in and out,
sustaining you till the end.

Erin Kelly’s Blackbird Fly Inspires – A Review by Ayesha F. Hamid

Typically a reader of adult fiction and nonfiction, I didn’t think that a middle grade novel would interest me as much as Blackbird Fly did, yet I found myself quickly flipping through the pages to find out what would happen to the book’s protagonist, Apple Yengko.

Apple and her mother left the Philippines for the United States when Apple was four; the death of Apple’s father caused the family to immigrate to America. Now attending a middle school in Louisiana, Apple is ostracized because of her ethnic background. She feels that she doesn’t have anyone who understands or relates to her. Nevertheless, Apple still has hopes and dreams. She loves music and wants to learn guitar, so she can become a rock star.

 

Blackbird Fly is an inspiring read for both children and adults alike. Erin Kelly has created a convincing world in which children isolate each other for insignificant and arbitrary reasons. In this world, we witness, through Apple, the resilience of the human spirit. This book shows children, who may be left out or bullied, that it is vitally important to keep hope alive. On the other hand, adult readers, like me, will root for Apple and in so doing give some closure to their own childhood trauma.

Blackbird Fly is published by Greenwillow Books and is available here: http://amzn.to/1YuVyot

 

 

 

Required Elements of Authentic Historical Fiction – by Ayesha F. Hamid

Historical fiction must be authentic in order to pull the reader in, so that writers who create works in this genre should consider how their work can be as authentic as possible. In order to effectively emulate specific worlds in historical fiction, the writer must research and know the world that they are trying to recreate because members of specific societies and cultures have unique ways of interacting with their environment and each other.

In writing historical fiction, there are a number of ways that authors can add authenticity to their work; however, I will focus on four essential qualities that make characters and their interactions more genuine. In order to achieve authenticity, and therefore believability, a work must: use appropriate language for the time period, be correct in the way characters were able (or unable) to speak/interact with each other in terms of class, race, gender, etc, make sure not to insert contemporary ways of thinking or behavior into an era in which such behavior/interaction was unheard of, and make sure that the backdrop with which characters will interact with is historically accurate. Possession by A.S. Byatt, Feig by Richard Bank, The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder, and Immortal by Traci Slatton are all books that adhere to these characteristics.

In the following, paragraph from Byatt’s Possession, we see many of the requisites for authentic interaction in historical fiction. Two fictional poets, one male and the other female, communicate with each other through letters, and their interaction speaks to the time period, emulating how men and women would have communicated with each other in the Victorian era.

My dear Friend,

If I address you So – it is for the Last Time as well as for the First. We have rushed down a Slope – I at least have rushed – where we might have descended more circumspectly – or Not at All. It has been borne in upon me that there are dangers in our continued conversation – I fear I lack delicacy in saying so – I see no good way out indeed – I reproach you with nothing – not myself neither – unless with an indiscreet confessional – and of what then – that I loved my father, and was set upon writing an epic? But the world would not look well upon such letters – between a woman living in a shared solitude as I do – and a man – even if that man were a great and wise poet” (Byatt, 184).

In this fictional letter, we see quite a few elements of authenticity. The word choice is specific, as well as distinct from contemporary language. The female poet, writing the letter, refers to a lack of delicacy, something having been borne, reproaching another, among other similar and specific markers of language. It would be uncommon to hear anyone speaking like this today.

Noting that the “world would not look well upon such letters – between a man and a woman living in a shared solitude as I do,” this work of fiction also tells us the way men and women interacted with each other, as well as the way that people interacted with their society. In this passage we see a woman who is careful with the way she interacts with others for fear of societal disapproval. It is clear that Byatt was able to mirror the world in which her story is situated by researching, understanding, and then creating language, dialogue, and word usage that emulated the time in question.

If the writer of this passage did not have a better understanding of how men and women interacted with each other in this time, then they could have imposed their contemporary view of gender relations into the writing. If this was the case, then maybe the two poets would have gone out on a date at a local coffee shop. This type of scene would have destroyed the believability of the story. Luckily, in Possession, the writer made sure that characters acted in a way that makes sense for the time period in question.
Consider another passage taken from Traci Slatton’s Immortal:
I had never before held a sheet of paper, which was far too precious for a street urchin. In the meantime, when I went out into Florence, I sought information about Master Giotto. He had said he would return and wanted to see me, and I believed him. He had an honor about him that was obvious even to a mongrel like me. When he came back I wanted to impress him with my knowledge of his incomparable work. On a cold day after Christmas, I went to the monk Friar Pietro, who had once taken me into the Church Ognissanti to show me the glorius Madonna panel that Giotto had painted there.

“Asperges me, Domine, hyssop, et mundabor: Lavabis me, et super nivem dealbabor. Misere mei, Deus, Secundum Magnam Misericordium Tuam,” I called brightly, when I spied him sweeping the path outside the austere stone façade of the old church of Santa Maria Maggiore…..

In this passage, we see some of the same elements that make historical fiction authentic. The author acquaints the reader with the time period in question, and we see that it is a time where you could talk to a monk one minute and a master artist in the next. It was also a time when everyone, even the poor, were familiar with Latin because the church was a central part of their lives.

Slatton also shows us how the different classes were treated in this time. The phrase Master Giotto means more than just master artist. It is a marker of his rank in society. On the other hand, the main character, who is sometimes called Luca Bastardo (bastard) refers to himself as a “mongrel.” The reader can infer that this is Luca’s view of himself after he’s internalized his own treatment in society.

So, words and how they are used are definitely important. The importance of words extends to other languages when a writer may choose to use an alternate to English. This is done to add depth in the descriptions thereby making the story more authentic. In the above example, we see the writer use Latin to show that individuals living in this time were more familiar with the language. What people call each other and how they describe or refer to themselves can also tell us a lot about the time period in question.

Writers should keep the following in mind when describing their specific time period: how would a specific character be seen by the world, would this person be powerful or powerless, strong or weak, knowledgeable or ignorant, how would the world react to this person, based on what you know about the time period in question, would people find it inappropriate to make fun of someone because they – have a disability, don’t have parents, are different in some way, or would the society in question find it to be typical to call someone “bastardo” or “village idiot,” etc? Members of society can be dehumanized, and this fact is something that is important to the narrative.

Richard Bank’s Feig is a book that describes, in detail, the dehumanization of people. It effectively utilizes elements that are necessary for authentic historical fiction. Consider the following paragraph.
“It was sometime late in May 1944…We were put to work outside Budapest. Conditions were very harsh, you know. We slept on the ground. Nothing over our heads. If it rained, we got wet….the gendarmes fed us two meal a day – gruel in the morning and soup with bits of meat at night. We also were given stale bread that you soaked in the soup to soften it….But I was hungry then, David. Always, I was hungry.” (Bank 32).

Accurately situating the characters within their time period and setting, the author tells us that they are working in Budapest and dealing with harsh conditions. The gendarmes, which is the correct historical term, feed the prisoners gruel and stale bread. Bank adds a detail which make the character’s speech more believable; one can tell that Feig’s first language is not English because he inverts the placement of words and finishes sentences with phrases like “you know.” Instead of saying “I was always hungry,” Feig says “Always, I was hungry.” So, other important questions for a writer to ask are: where is this character from, how did this character grow up, does this character speak in a unique way, and what drives this character?
In order to write effective historical fiction ask yourself the preceding questions as well as: what conflicts did people face in their time, what did they eat, what nourishment or comfort was available to them, and were they speaking in a language that was not their first? Note that questions surrounding primary language can be particularly important in places like Europe where people often spoke and still speak more than one language. Language is just one of the things a writer should consider when trying to create an effective work of historical fiction.

So, this genre of fiction is unique in that the story has to be based in a setting and context that considers historical fact. To write historical fiction is to try to create a unique world within a past that actually existed, and the created world has to mirror a past that once was. Four specific actions can help a writer to make their historical fiction more believable. These include: using appropriate language for the time period, being correct in the way characters were able (or unable) to speak/interact with each other in terms of class, race, gender, etc, making sure not to insert contemporary ways of thinking or behavior into an era in which such behavior/interaction was unheard of, and making sure that the backdrop with which characters interact with is historically accurate. By following these guidelines, you will create characters, settings, and situations which will have your readers questioning whether they are reading fiction, or something that actually took place.